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Friday, April 10, 2020

My CovBlog: Day 26

Hola,

Well, I will never win an award for math! I just now figured out today is Day 26, (not Day 25,) and this is blog post #498, (not #499!)

On the upside, I get to write one more post Monday and celebrate Tuesday with one less day before the lockdown ends in [insert best guess here.]

Though it's Easter in many parts of the world, Holy Week in Spain is a wonderful and proud tradition, and I'm sure there are hundreds of thousands of people around the country missing the annual tradition of the penance processions.

I'll leave you with these pictures taken either 78 or 80 days ago, depending on who you ask.

On Jan. 17, I was walking to the pub, when I heard a commotion...


From Wikipedia: "Seville arguably holds some of the most elaborate processions for Holy Week. The tradition dates back hundreds of years. The "Semana Santa de Sevilla" is notable for featuring the procession of "pasos", lifelike painted wooden sculptures of individual scenes of the events that happened between Jesus' entry in Jerusalem and his burial, or images of the Virgin Mary showing restrained grief after the torture and killing of her son."


...Around the corners comes at least 21 lads under a bulky, heavy "practice float."

"Some of the images are artistic masterworks of great antiquity. One of the Most Popular and Beautiful Image of the Virgin Mary depicting her Sorrows is the Nuestra Señora de la Esperanza de Triana, "La Reina y Señora de Sevilla" (The Queen and Lady of Seville)."


As they can't see a thing, the lads trust and follow the voice of the guy out front...

"These pasos (which usually weigh MORE than a metric TON) are physically carried on the neck of costaleros (literally "sack men", for their distinctive -and functional- headdress)."


The procession continues up the hill... So sad their efforts were in vain this year

"Anywhere from 24 to 48 "costaleros" are hidden inside the platform of the "paso", so it seems to walk alone. Historically dock workers were hired to carry the pasos. From 1973 onward, that task has been universally taken over by the members of the confraternities who organize each procession."


An example from the same town during a recent Semana Santa






And finally....
The countdown to Semana Santa at 10:15 p.m. this past January...



12 mins & 17 seconds later... according to my timestamp.

Only in Spain :)

Wishing everyone a Good Friday and best wishes for as happy of an Easter holiday as is possible.

10 comments:

Elephant's Child said...

Wow.
And a very, very happy and healthy Easter to you too.

Alex J. Cavanaugh said...

Sorry you won't see the procession. Have a blessed Easter though.

Tyrean Martinson said...

Have a blessed Easter

CWMartin said...

And blessings to you, too.

Jo said...

I remember some of those wonderful processions in Spain. They really "go to town" with them. Such a pity you won't see it this year. Felices Pascuas

Lisa said...

Hopefully next year will see the parades come back again!

Lee said...

Just imagine how adept you will be at math when the isolation period is over! lol

Take good care. :)

Elizabeth Seckman said...

Happy belated Easter. We were doing our quarantine calendar, but we've also lost track. We started ours on March 14th...I think a week ahead of the governor's order because this guy in Spain said a crap-storm was headed our way.

Stay safe. Stay healthy!

Melissa said...

Wow, that's beautiful!

David Powers King said...

Wishing you well too, Mark! Hope you're able to be out and about now more. :)

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